Tuesday, February 23, 2010

The Post reports on a street artist with work in the neighborhood

Today the Washington Post wrote about artist Bryant K. Adams, who designed some stickers I noticed in the neighborhood a few months ago. The stickers, pictured here, are on utility boxes and such around the town, causing some folks on this blog to debate whether it's art or litter. He also does sculpture and photography, including one piece at 14th and V.

It's an interesting article, and there's a photo gallery as well. And they mentioned my blog, which is pretty cool.

Personally I like street art like this and interesting, artistic graffiti, but not the gang- or crew-related stuff. And then there's the posters for events that people stick to utility boxes and street poles, like the ANSWER Coalition. I'm not a fan of those, because they're up for months at a time, often well after the event has happened.

Some people see them all as the same thing, but I think there's a difference.

3 comments:

Alex said...

The ANSWER coalition are professional protesters who have absolutely nothing to add to this world, and in fact probably undermine the antiwar effort through association.

Jamie said...

The sticker itself is art. Anything you want to call art is art.

But plastering them all over DC like on buses and signs is litter -- and is nothing more than a self-serving publicity effort.

It's illegal to post your "we buy houses" signs in public places, and it's illegal to spray paint graffiti. Stickers are no different.

I am sure some people like them or don't care, much. But at the end of the day, if everyone stuck their shit wherever they wanted, the whole world would look like crap. It's not up to individuals to decide that their "art" is worthy of being on a bus or a street sign. It's up to society - and we have decided that it's illegal to do stuff like that. With good reason.

Rob said...

I actually saw this guy with his family one night at El Pollo Rico in Arlington. Glad to know the crazy welding goggles are serving a higher artistic power.