Monday, January 11, 2010

Columbia Heights mostly misses parking rate hikes

There's been a lot going on about parking zone changes and meter fee hikes, but it looks like we've mostly avoided them.

The Post has a good breakdown -- the closest to the neighborhood is more nighttime enforcement on U Street, and meter hikes at Howard University and on U Street.

Photo from here


Anonymous said...

U Street to Girard Street NW is definitely Columbia Heights (Pleasant Plains). So yes we are affected.

Andrew said...

The way I read it was only on Howard's campus, from 9th to 2nd, U to Girard.

Anonymous said...

Yes but Columbia Heights encompasses Howard (except for a small part in Ledroit):

East boundary of CH is N Capital and South boundary is Florida/U Street

Andrew said...

Well, the boundaries are debatable -- usually I hear McMillan Reservoir (4th-6th Street)or even Georgia Ave is the eastern border.

Anonymous said...


If you tax record says Columbia Heights then you live in Columbia Heights. There is no debate about it. The lines are very well defined by the city. Just do your homework.

Andrew said...

Again, the boundaries are debatable. I wouldn't rely on the tax records for boundaries, as there are far fewer assessment districts than there are actual neighborhoods in the city, and they're often much bigger than what most people agree with, or not used at all. For example, if you live in Logan, Shaw or parts of downtown, the tax records say you're in "Old City I" or "Old City II." No one uses those names. There's also no Adams Morgan in the tax records, for example.

I've written about this issue before. Most people say Howard is part of Pleasant Plains:

Anonymous said...

Yes but Pleasant Plains is part of Columbia Heights.

Since the only real definition of Columbia Heights is the tax database, that becomes the definitive definition.

If I had it my way, I would group 14th Street with Mt. Pleasant, not Columbia Heights. There is a lot of crime that is associated with Columbia Heights that should actually be associated with Mt. Pleasant. But then that would bring down property values in Mt. Pleasant and we can't have that happen.

Andrew said...

I don't agree that Pleasant Plains is part of Columbia Heights, for the same reason I explained before -- the city's tax boundaries include neighborhood names no one uses (Old City I and Old City II, which include Shaw, Logan, and other named areas), and don't include other places at all, like Adams Morgan. But those are clearly neighborhoods of their own. The tax boundaries are generalized for tax assessments, nothing else.

The neighborhood was named Columbia Heights after Columbian College, which was located on Meridian Hill before the park was there. Meridian Hill is from 15th to 16th Street. Thus I would include that area.

This sounds like it could be a blog post -- how people define the neighborhood.

Anonymous said...

The city tax office says that Pleasant Plains is part of Columbia Heights. The city expanded Columbia Heights to include many surrounding areas.

Meridian Hill Park is actually historically called Cardoza, with U Street being Lower Cardoza and Euclid being Upper Cardoza.

The problem is that the Metro Station at Columbia Heights should have been called something else since it is barely in Columbia Heights. Maybe Tivoli or 16th Street Heights?

Jamie said...

@Anon: The very same office also says that my house is worth $400,000, even though I paid half that for it a year ago. I'll sell it to you for $350K! Since you believe everything the tax office says, you'll be getting an awesome deal.

"Since the only real definition of Columbia Heights is the tax database, that becomes the definitive definition."

Have it your way. Next time you're in Old City II let's grab a drink at The Big Hunt.

Or maybe a trip to the Zoo, or New Heights, both in the Garfield neighborhood? Since there is no Cleveland Park.

Or stop by UDC, which straddles Forest Hills and Wakefield, because Van Ness doesn't exist.

Adams Morgan? Shaw? Figments of your imagination. They don't exist either.

I guess every map ever printed, as well as countless neighborhood associations, Metro, and everyone else who ever referred to those nonexistent neighborhoods all got it wrong.

But you got it right! Too bad nobody else will have any idea what you're talking about. But at least you'll feel superior when you tell someone you're going to be hanging out in Wakefield, Old City, or some other place like "R.L.A. NE" listed in the tax database.