Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Latin gang violence in northern CH?

I've been hearing more about this lately, both from the news, commenters here, and from friends. For example, I was at the Red Derby yesterday and a buddy came in, saying he had just talked to a few cops who said a lot of stuff had gone down at the gas station at 14th and Otis recently, stabbings and such. I'm guessing these are the same incidents in the articles - stabbings and a possible increase in gang activity there, shown by an increase in graffiti. As always, I recommend calling any gang graffiti into the city's Service Request Center (call 311 or src.dc.gov), especially gang-related. Letting your councilmember know (Jim Graham for most of us) is probably useful, or if you have a local MPD officer's phone number or email, that too.

Anyone else notice this kind of crime up there? I've sort of been of the theory that if you aren't in a gang, they probably won't mess with you as they don't want even more police attention, which seems to especially be the case with the Latin American gangs. Anyone else?

3 comments:

  1. Does anyone know what happened tonight (Thursday, May 14th) at the corner of Spring Rd and 14th? I was heading out of my apartment to walk my dog around 10:40pm when I heard about 8-10 gunshots...

    - Spring Rd dog walker

    ReplyDelete
  2. Check out the below link,

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/05/16/AR2009051600081.html

    It sounds like there must have been two shootings last night. I walked past the 14th and Columbia Rd scene this morning and a small memorial was put up around a street light. I can't believe the murder happened in such a busy area at such a busy time.

    I'd like to see a post on the shootings with the opportunity for Columbia Heights residents to leave comments.

    -New to Columbia Heights

    ReplyDelete
  3. TEACHING THE VALUES OF PEACE

    By: Mike (Ali) Raccoon Eyes Kinney






    As a Cherokee Native American Activist and a former member of the Richmond California Violence Prevention Movement, I have seen close to 515 homicides in the City of Richmond from 2001 to the present.

    The declaration of a 'war on violence' by the Richmond city government was not the panacea, instead it failed miserably.

    I have often stated in town hall meetings and on television, the best way to win the 'war on violence' in Richmond is to 'TEACH THE VALUES OF PEACE'.

    In the killing fields of Richmond, most of the victims of homicides are youth or young adults. Teaching the values of peace begins with our youth and young adults. From a Native perspective, winning the war on violence begins in the home with a strong, spiritual belief and value system.

    We believe that Creator made all generations, past, present and those of the future, holy people. This is what our Elders teach us from the time we are born.

    Our families and Elders teach our young people that they must tear away the images and stereotypes that mainstream society has placed upon them as Native peoples.

    Violence and killing is not traditional in Native culture, it is a learned behavior from mainstream society.

    We teach our youths not to attack, punish or beat themselves up for crimes that they have never committed in regards to racism. Our Elders and families teach our young people to have good self-esteem, self-worth and self-value, for as the original holy people this was Creators plan.

    Native people know that it is both family and community responsibility to teach the values of peace to our young people.

    We teach our young people honesty and accountability concerning violence. It begins with accepting responsibility for self and acknowledging any past use of violence.

    Admitting any wrongdoing, communicating openly and truthfully to renounce the use of violence in the future places our youth on the right path. We place a heavy emphasis that all life is sacred.

    The final lesson in teaching the values of peace is quite simple. It is helping young people understand their relationship to others and all things in Creation.

    Be responsible for your role, act with compassion and respect, and remember ALL LIFE IS SACRED. Native culture is prevention!

    Mike (Ali) Raccoon Eyes Kinney

    ReplyDelete

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